[33069-62-4] Paclitaxel AKSci A648
 
 
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  A648    
Paclitaxel
, 99% (HPLC)
 
Taxol




IDENTITY
CAS Number:[33069-62-4]
MDL Number:MFCD00869953
MF:C47H51NO14
MW:853.91
EINECS:205-285-7
BRN:1420457
SPECIFICATIONS & PROPERTIES
Purity:99% (HPLC)
Available Spectra:LCMS, FT-IR, HPLC, Polarimetry
Physical Form:White to off-white powder
Melting Point:213-220°C
Optical Rotation:-49° - -54° (c=1, MeOH)
Density:0.2
Long-Term Storage:Store long-term at 2-8°C
UN #:Not HazMat

BIOLOGICAL INFO
Solubility:DMSO: 171mg/mL; H2O: <1mg/mL; EtOH: 18mg/mL
Application(s):Mitotic inhibitor

REVIEW

 Paclitaxel interferes with the normal function of microtubule growth. Whereas drugs like colchicine cause the depolymerization of microtubules in vivo, paclitaxel arrests their function by having the opposite effect; it hyper-stabilizes their structure. This destroys the cell's ability to use its cytoskeleton in a flexible manner. Specifically, paclitaxel binds to the β-subunit of tubulin. Tubulin is the ''building block'' of mictotubules, and the binding of paclitaxel locks these building blocks in place. The resulting microtubule/paclitaxel complex does not have the ability to disassemble. This adversely affects cell function because the shortening and lengthening of microtubules (termed dynamic instability) is necessary for their function as a transportation highway for the cell. Chromosomes, for example, rely upon this property of microtubules during mitosis. Further research has indicated that paclitaxel induces programmed cell death (apoptosis) in cancer cells by binding to an apoptosis stopping protein called Bcl-2 (B-cell leukemia 2) and thus arresting its function.

REFERENCES
[1]Wall ME, Wani MC: Camptothecin and taxol: discovery to clinic - thirteenth Bruce F. Cain Memorial Award Lecture. Cancer Res. 1995 Feb 15;55(4):753-60.
[2] Wani MC, Taylor HL, Wall ME, Coggon P, McPhail AT: Plant antitumor agents. VI. The isolation and structure of taxol, a novel antileukemic and antitumor agent from Taxus brevifolia. J Am Chem Soc. 1971 May 5;93(9):2325-7.
[3] Fuchs DA, Johnson RK: Cytologic evidence that taxol, an antineoplastic agent from Taxus brevifolia, acts as a mitotic spindle poison. Cancer Treat Rep. 1978 Aug;62(8):1219-22.
[4] Saville MW, Lietzau J, Pluda JM, Feuerstein I, Odom J, Wilson WH, Humphrey RW, Feigal E, Steinberg SM, Broder S, et al.: Treatment of HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma with paclitaxel. Lancet. 1995 Jul 1;346(8966):26-8.

GHS

Pictograms

Signal Word
Danger

Hazard Statements
H315; H317; H318; H334; H335; H341; H361; H370; H413

Precautionary Statements
P201; P202; P260; P264; P270; P271; P272; P273; P280; P302+P352; P304+P340; P305+P351+P338; P310; P321; P333+P313; P362; P403+P233; P405; P501


Current as of March 30, 2017


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CATEGORIES

 APIs and Bioactives > Alkaloids, Chemotherapeutics


PubChem